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New Home Sales Decline from Downgraded May Numbers

by Lakeshore Realty
  • New Home Sales Decline from Downgraded May Numbers
 
New homes sales retreated in June from the very strong performance reported for May; a performance that turns out to have been less strong. A joint release from the Census Bureau and the Department of Housing and Urban Development this morning put June sales of newly constructed single family homes at a seasonally adjusted annual pace of 406,000 units. This represents an 8.1 percent drop from the revised May rate of 442,000. May sales however were originally estimated to be at the rate of 504,000 units which would have been an 18.6 percent increase over April and, the report said, the most rapid increase in 20 years.
 

June sales were also down, by 11.5 percent year over year. Those sales were estimated at 459,000.

 

On an unadjusted basis there were 38,000 new homes sold in June, down from 42,000 in May and 43,000 a year earlier. Unadjusted May sales were originally estimated at 49,000 units.

 

There were an estimated 197,000 homes for sale at the end of June, a 5.8 month supply at the current rate of absorption. One year earlier there was an estimated 4.2 month supply. Homes that sold in June were on the market an estimated 3.4 months, unchanged from May but substantially below the 4.2 months required for marketing a year earlier.

 

The median price of a new home sold in June was $273,500 compared to $259,800 in June 2013. The average price was $331,400 compared to $306,100 in the earlier period.

 

Sales in every region were lower than in May; 20.0 percent in the Northeast, 8.2 percent in the Midwest, 9.5 percent and 1.9 percent in the South and West respectively. The Midwest had the only year-over-year increase, up 19.6 percent from the previous June. Sales in the Northeast declined 27.3 percent and were down 17.4 percent in the south and 9.4 percent in the West.

 

SOURCE: www.mortgagenewsdaily.com 

Where the foreclosures are: 10 top states

by Lakeshore Realty

Where the foreclosures are: 10 top states

By Chris Kahn of Bankrate.com

Foreclosure filings fell 5 percent nationally from April to May. Take a look at the top 10 states for foreclosure, and see if yours made the list.

Live in one of these 10 states? According to RealtyTrac, a California-based firm that tracks foreclosures, your state had one of the highest rates of foreclosure in May. Nationally, 1 in every 1,199 housing units received a foreclosure filing in May.

10. South Carolina

South Carolina: 1 in every 851 housing units received a foreclosure filing.

Change in filings from last month: Up 4.59 percent

 

 

9. Connecticut

Connecticut: 1 in every 835 housing units received a foreclosure filing.

Change in filings from last month: Up 6.21 percent

 

8. Indiana

Indiana: 1 in every 823 housing units received a foreclosure filing.

Change in filings from last month: Down 17.23 percent

 

 

7. Delaware

Delaware: 1 in every 818 housing units received a foreclosure filing.

Change in filings from last month: Down 19.74 percent

 

 

6. New Jersey

New Jersey: 1 in every 815 housing units received a foreclosure filing.

Change in filings from last month: Down 14.1 percent

 

 

5. Ohio

Ohio: 1 in every 805 housing units received a foreclosure filing.

Change in filings from last month: Down 6.85 percent

 

 

4. Illinois

Illinois: 1 in every 790 housing units received a foreclosure filing.

Change in filings from last month: Down 10.59 percent

 

 

3. Nevada

Nevada: 1 in every 717 housing units received a foreclosure filing.

Change in filings from last month: Up 7.36 percent

 

 

2. Maryland

Maryland: 1 in every 621 housing units received a foreclosure filing.

Change in filings from last month: Up 0.45 percent

 

 

1. Florida

Florida: 1 in every 436 housing units received a foreclosure filing.

Change in filings from last month: Down 8.14 percent

Lakeshore Realty Featured Property

by Lakeshore Realty

Lakeshore Realty Featured Property

Our Lakeshore Realty listing at 405 Tracy Court is a real beauty among the North Lake Tahoe real estate listings.

405 Tracy Court

Bedrooms: 5

Bathrooms: 5.5 

Sq. Ft.: 6330

Year Built: 1980

PRICE: 3,895,000

By far one of Tahoe's most beautiful and exclusive great room floor plans! The entry says "You Have Arrived" as you take a step down into the main level. A cabin designed for modern times with hardwood floor throughout. Spacious dining room off living room and kitchen. Windows embrace this room  offering incredible views of forest and filtered views of the lake.

To access all the Incline Village and Lakeshore Realty listings please click here. You can also contact us by email or call us at 775-831-7000. If you are in Incline Village, please visit us at 954 Lakeshore Blvd. Incline Village, NV 89451.

  • New Lakeshore Realty Homes for Sale in Lake Tahoe, Incline Village Nevada

These are some of the newest listings at Lakeshore Realty on the North Lake Tahoe's Incline Village Real Estate Market.

574 Amagosa Rd.

Bed: 4
Bath: 2
Year: 1973
Sq. Ft.: 1676

Price: $625,000

 

Listing Agent:
Tim Lampe  

Panoramic Lake-View home for $625,000.  Granite kitchen, newer appliances and cabinets, new gas fireplace, newer floors.  This home has two bed-rooms up and 2 down.  Huge entertainment deck.  Very clean and ready to enjoy.  Furnishings are negotiable.  Coverage information available for future expansion or garage.  This is a great value with some of the best lake-views in Tahoe.  BMP's and exterior freshened up with paint and many repairs complete 6/5/2014.  Just a great property at this price.

 

400 Fairview Blvd.

Bed: 2
Bath: 2
Year: 1991
Sq. Ft.: 1351

Price: $465,000

 

Listing Agent:
Kristi & Jamie 

Exceptional mountain and lake view condo. Completely remodeled with beautiful finishes throughout. 2Bdrm 2 full baths, one attached garage plus carport. A must see!

 

807 Alder

Bed: 3
Bath: 3
Year: 1974
Sq. Ft.: 1216

Price: $349,900

 

Listing Agent:
Tim Lampe  

Very Rare All-Seasons Upper Unit.  3 bed-room, 3 bath unit.  New granite kitchen, cabinets, appliances, windows and slider.  Interior all fresh and ready to enjoy.  Nice exterior entertainment deck plus master bed-room deck.  Pride of ownership shows everywhere.  Wood beamed ceilings in living and master bed-rooms.  In-unit washer/dryer.  Tons of storage through-out.  This is just a great property at a great price.  Central location, walk to everything.  All-Seasons Amenities and Club.

 

809 Jeffrey Ct.

Bed: 5
Bath: 4.5
Year: 1980
Sq. Ft.: 4524

Price: $1,498,000

 

Listing Agent:
Chris & Patti Plastiras

Spacious Panoramic Lakeview Home located in a serene Cul-de-Sac setting.  Home is South facing and backs to Forest Service for added privacy.  Features include a spacious Great Room & large Sunny Trex Decks.  The Master Bedroom Suite is on its own level and boasts a Sitting Area w/Fireplace plus adjacent Office/Den.  The separate Guest Quarters include 1 Bedroom 2 Bath, a complete Kitchen, Wet Bar, Fireplace & separate Entry.  There is potential for a Bonus/Media Room expansion under the Garage.

 

136 Juanita Dr.

Bed: 3
Bath: 2
Year: 1974
Sq. Ft.: 1200

Price: $469,000

 

                                               Listing Agent:
Pam Fernandez

Coeur du Lac, "Heart of the Lake" Perfect location w/great pvt amenities. Walk to beach, town & Hyatt hotel/casino. Complex has beautiful outdoor seasonal pool,year round sauna,hot tub & small exercise rm. Level entry,this is a 2 story,3 bdrm/2 bath floor plan.Living room, kitchen & master on entry level.Lovely setting surrounded by lush green lawns. Nearby shared BBQ area.Some furniture stays. Great vacation rental. Wood burning fireplace,remodeled master bath. A real pleasure to show!

 

400 Fairview Blvd.

Bed: 4
Bath: 3.5
Year: 1993
Sq. Ft.: 2376

Price: $675,000

 

                                               Listing Agent:
Carole Madrid

Incredible Lake and ski hill views.  Remodel just completed to include kitchen w/all new appliances, new carpet, paint, all new fiberglass windows & sliding glass doors throughout, new shower doors & fixtures in every bathroom, new lighting throughout 2 fireplaces, sauna & steam shower. End Unit - 4 levels of living. Stunning unit !!!  

 

1415 Tirol Dr.

Bed: 4
Bath: 3
Year: 1982
Sq. Ft.: 2412

Price: $569,000

 

Listing Agent:
Pam Fernandez

The ultimate ski chalet!  Very spacious home on corner lot. 4 bdrms, 3 full baths & private lavs in each bedroom. Spacious Great room, dining area, kitchen & 2 bedrooms on entry level. 2 bedrooms, huge loft with small view of Lake Tahoe & laundry all on 2nd level. Easy access.  Short path and few stairs to front door. 2 decks out front & decks off each bedroom. Quiet area.  Garage addition possible -must purchase coverage, plans, permits, etc. New paint & carpet & interior doors throughout.

 

1026 Apollo

Bed: 3
Bath: 3
Year: 1980
Sq. Ft.: 2364

Price: $999,999

 

                                               Listing Agent:
Carole Madrid

Incredible lakeviews, remodeled gourmet kitchen with stainless appliances & slab granite counters. 3FP in Living Rm, DiningRm/Mastr BD. Bathrooms remodeled w/heated floors in master bathrm. 3 Bedrooms/3baths, loft area for office/exercise area,full bar w/slab granite counters, hardwood floors throughout. One bedroom/bath on main living area- Beautiful sunny decks for entertaining.  Private setting.  3 car garage w/boat parking. Home is impeccable - shows beautifully!

 

1407 Tirol Dr.

Bed: 3
Bath: 2.5
Year: 1999
Sq. Ft.: 2060

Price: $859,000

 

Listing Agent:
Pam Fernandez

Perched on knoll on a quiet cul du sac in Tirolian Village. This is a beautiful modern European style home offering lovely views of Lake Tahoe and Diamond Peak. Nice setting with lovely wooded views out most windows. Great room with cathedral ceilings and nice deck. Detached garage addition possible with HOA approval and purchase of "coverage".  

To access all the Incline Village and Lakeshore Realty listings please click here. You can also contact us by email or call us at 775-831-7000. If you are in Incline Village, please visit us at 954 Lakeshore Blvd. Incline Village, NV 89451.

June 2014 Incline Village Real Estate Office Rankings

by Lakeshore Realty

Lakeshore Realty is still the leader in Real Estate sales in the Incline Village and Crystal Bay real estate market. So far this year our office was involved in the sale of 76 properties around the North Shore of Lake Tahoe. Looking forward, our office is dedicated to ensure that all our clients real estate needs are fulfilled.


This chart reflects real estate sales that took place between Jan 1, 2014 through June 30, 2014.

14 mistakes that will kill your home's value

by Lakeshore Realty

14 mistakes that will kill your home's value

By Christopher Solomon of MSN Real Estate

Your home is your castle, and you can do what you want with it. Right? Sure. But if you want a good return on the dough — and sweat equity — you pour into Home Sweet Home, you should make sure those changes are smart ones.

Too often, that’s not the case. Real-estate agents and appraisers say they regularly see homeowners make changes that don't increase the value of the home by much, if at all. Some renovations or alterations can even drag down the value of a home. Then, of course, there is all the damage that a lack of upkeep and upgrades can do.

Check out these 14 home-improvement blunders and our tips from the experts on how to steer clear of them.

1. Going overboard for the area

The common mistake: A common mistake homeowners make is improving a home too much for the neighborhood, turning the home into a pricey outlier. How much is too much? That depends. "If you're in a really nice neighborhood, it would be hard to over improve something," says Jay Josephs, a certified appraiser for 23 years and the president of the Josephs Appraisal Group in Phoenix. But if you, say, install a $20,000 pool behind a $60,000 house, "you might get $5,000 to $8,000 return," Josephs says.

What you should do: "Pay real close attention to the common denominator in a neighborhood," says Sandra Nickel, the owner of Sandra Nickel Hat Team, a real-estate agency based in Montgomery, Ala. Talk to a trusted real-estate agent or an appraiser, and ask for an appraisal without improvements and another with them. If it doesn't pay off, "it's not a good value," Nickel says.

 

2. Inconsistency

The common mistake: Homeowners goof by upgrading inconsistently, which hurts value, says Josephs, who is also a partner at Value Trend Solutions. "I have seen completely remodeled kitchens where people have spent $40,000 or $50,000 on a kitchen, and the rest of the house is untouched — there are vinyl floors, blue shag carpeting," he says.

What you should do: "The best way to get the greatest return on your home is to cure the deficiencies. Find out what's the baseline in your particular neighborhood — and anything you can do to bring your home up to that baseline … is probably an investment worth doing," Josephs says. "One of the things I like to say is, 'Stone floors and vinyl floors should never be touching.'"

 

3. Closing off the porch

The common mistake: Some folks see a front porch as an opportunity for another four-season room. That's a no-no, Nickel says. "Obviously, the people who want to live in that neighborhood value being able to interact with their neighborhood," she says. High fences and enclosed porches prohibit that, she says. "Do not wall yourself from the community, if community is one of the assets of your neighborhood."

What you should do: If you want to create a comfortable, usable space, make the front porch a screened porch, Nickel says. If you have a larger full porch, perhaps enclose half of the porch. But be sure to keep most of the porch open to the outside world. You — and prospective buyers — will be happy you did.

 

4. Too much 'you' in your home

The common mistake: Debi Fortin, a managing broker with Windermere Real Estate-Greenwood in Seattle, knows a homeowner who's tidy and doesn't cook. So when the woman remodeled her kitchen, she went spare. She removed cabinets, put the refrigerator in the garage and added two little dorm-sized fridges in small niches. It's gorgeous — and nearly useless to everyone but the original homeowner. A remodel to such her personal taste decreased the home's value, Fortin says, because everyone expects a working kitchen.

What you should do: It's fine to add a personal touch to your remodel, but remember that you likely won't live in your home forever. Remember that your changes need to speak to a future homeowner. Or be prepared to eat your additional investment — and possibly more.

 

5. Screwing up the floor plan

The common mistake: Too many people aren't careful when they add square footage to a home, agents and appraisers say. "Adding a bedroom where you've got to walk through the laundry room to get there — most appraisers would call that 'functional obsolescence,'" Josephs says. Another example: adding a bedroom on the east side of the house when the bathrooms are on the west side of the house. "Those are additions that are probably not going to bring you a return on the investment that you're going to be satisfied with."

What you should do: "Keep in mind the functional integrity of the floor plan," Josephs says. Better yet, hire an architect who is trained to think about the design and flow of spaces.

 

6. Keeping the above-ground pool

The common mistake: Above-ground pools are pretty much a disaster, says Rodney Lee Camren, a real-estate agent with Keller Williams Realty Atlanta Intown. Often, part of the ground has to be excavated to sit them on even ground; they can be hard to enter and exit; and owners often don't clean them well or cover them, making them eyesores and havens for mosquitoes, he says. Most would-be homebuyers view them "as cheap and usually more of a nuisance than anything," he says. "They're bad. And they're tacky."

What you should do: If you already have a pool, by all means enjoy it. But get rid of it and rehab the yard completely before you sell.

 

7. Tackling big projects yourself

The common mistake: You want to feel useful and you also want to save money. So you tackle those big projects around the house. But in all likelihood you're not nearly as good at those DIY projects as you think you are, and it shows, Camren says. "Too many times a homeowner will go in and say, 'Hey, I can do this.' Really, you can't," he says. "When you go to sell your home, a buyer is going to spot sloppy tile."

What you should do: Unless you're pretty gifted, "stop doing the [big] DIY projects," he urges. "Hire a professional."

A professional will also steer you away from making rookie mistakes such as putting tiles on countertops that really belong on the floor.

 

8. Overstuffing the remodel

The common mistake: Oftentimes when homeowners remodel a kitchen or a bathroom, they “put bigger items in there than there should be," Camren says. For instance, homeowners will remodel with a giant piece of furniture that includes a built-in sink and cabinetry that overwhelms the bathroom, he says. The space ends up feeling cramped, and future homebuyers will pick up on that.

What you should do: "Really, all you need is a pedestal sink in the bathroom — slender, with no storage, and with good clean lines," Camren says. Store most of your bathroom supplies in the linen closet, he recommends. The result will be a more airy, roomy space that you and prospective buyers — will like.

 

9. Getting too trendy

The common mistake: Everybody wants a fashionable home, but too trendy can be a trap. "Something that's real hot today that I think is going to be a problem in a few years? Those skinny tile backsplashes" in kitchens, Nickel says. "It's gonna be like avocado appliances" were a few years ago, Nickel predicts. "Ten years ago, garden tubs and separate showers were all the rage," she says. "Nobody wants a garden tub anymore; we figured out we don't get in them." Homeowners are ripping them out to put in a nice standing shower, she says.

What you should do: "Be very aware of what's trendy, and avoid it at all costs," Nickel says. Steer toward looks that are a bit more timeless, she says — so hip doesn't become dated.

 

10. Converting the garage

The common mistake: "I see too many people converting their garages to a living area," Josephs says. "The problem with that is that you've created 'functional obsolescence' because you've removed covered parking." When you sell your home, would-be buyers will see that the rest of the neighborhood has parking, while you don't. As a result, you’ll turn off perhaps 75% of your buyers, Josephs says.

What's more, he says, though a homeowner might have spent $10,000 to convert a garage into a living room or a man cave, the appraiser might turn around and say "the additional $10,000 is lost because of the impact of not having covered parking."

What you should do: Don't turn the garage into a living space, Josephs says. If you really want another place to hang out, consider a well-thought-out addition to the home.

 

11. Being a permit bandit

The common mistake: "Too many people are adding square footage and not getting permitting from the local authorities," Josephs says. What's wrong with sneaking in a little (or not-so-little) home-improvement project? Well, potentially lots of things: Appraisers and lenders may not include the value of an addition that was not permitted because they worry that insurers won't give money in case of an incident, Josephs says. "Some appraisers might give you full value, and some appraisers might give you no value."

"I have seen scenarios where the lender says, 'Not only do we not want to give value for this unpermitted addition, we want you to reducethe valuation of the home to consider the cost to demolish the addition," he says. "That's a bad investment."

What you should do: Don't be penny wise and pound foolish. Endure the cost and hassle of necessary permits for any work you have done.

 

12. Holding on to brass door knobs

The common mistake: "One thing I see a lot is that homes that were built in the 1990s still have brass hardware," says real-estate agent Kim Baker with Russ Lyon/Sotheby's International Realty in Scottsdale, Ariz. "It's very noticeable, if you walk into a home that has been updated with counters, cabinets and yet they haven't updated the hardware."  What's wrong with brass? "It's dated; it looks old," Baker says.

What you should do: "The No. 1 thing I tell people to do is change out your brass hardware," Baker says. Try fixtures made of chrome, brushed nickel or oil-rubbed bronze instead, she suggests. If you can't afford to redo your cabinets, "even changing out the brass will add value."

 

13. Being colorfast

The common mistake: Color is a personal issue for homeowners. They paint their walls everything from deep blue to blood red. Trouble is, some homeowners are loath to return those walls to a neutral color when it's time to sell the home. That's a huge mistake, Baker says.

Right now Baker has two houses for sale, four doors apart. The houses have the same builder and nearly the same floor plan. But in one house, the homeowner has painted the doors and some of the walls black and refuses to change them. "The one that doesn't have the black gets three times as many hits on the website," she says.

What you should do: Enjoy your home in whatever hue you wish, but with the understanding that you'll return it to innocuous colors before you plant that "For Sale" sign. "I just had someone paint a condo that they have used as an investment," Baker says. She urged the owner to cover the shiny yellow paint in an eggshell hue. The result? "I got an offer for her the first day. And she probably got 10% to 15% more [for the condo] than if she had not done that."

 

14. Ignoring flaws

The common mistake: A lot of folks are like Goldilocks: They think their home is just right and without flaws. Baker recalls one client to whom she suggested they do a pre-inspection before putting it up for sale. The seller balked, offended at the idea that her home might hide problems. When an offer was brought to her, she had more than $40,000 worth of repairs, including hail damage and termites, Baker says. "She was out a lot of money."

What you should do: "Disassociate yourself from your home," Baker says. "If your home is more than 10 years old, get an inspection done even before you list it so that you're not surprised by any problems and can deal with them."

North Lake Tahoe June 2014 Real Estate Sales Comparison

by Lakeshore Realty
  • North Lake Tahoe June 2014 Real Estate Sales Comparison

The charts bellow reflect Incline Village real estate sales for the month of June in the past 5 years. These reports we're created individually for Residential Home sales and Condominium Sales.

  • Residential Home Sales Report


Click here for larger image

- Please note that the report above was created using data extracted from the MLXChange System and reflects Residential Home sales.

  • Condominium Sales Report


Click here for larger image

- Please note that the report above was created using data extracted from the MLXChange System and reflects Condominium sales.

To access all the Incline Village and Lakeshore Realty listings please click here. You can also contact us by email or call us at 775-831-7000. If you are in Incline Village, please visit us at 954 Lakeshore Blvd. Incline Village, NV 89451.

9 fixes every homeowner should know

by Lakeshore Realty

9 fixes every homeowner should know

Not every home's a fixer-upper, but all houses need occasional repairs and maintenance. Here are a few tips to know when it comes to minor repairs around your house.

Toilet triage

In the life of every homeowner, there will be some clogged toilets. But they're simple to fix with a plunger, an auger, rubber gloves, and a bucket. If the bowl is in danger of overflowing, shut off the water supply valve behind the toilet and empty out half of the water. Try a plunger first, but if that doesn't work, grab an auger.

 

Clearing out the gutter

Even the ladder-averse can clean the gutters twice a year to prevent pests and ice dams. Remove leaves by hand or with the assistance of a leaf blower, garden hose or wet-dry vac. When you're up on a ladder, be sure to use a stabilizer. If sticking to ground level is more your style, you can still get the job done if you have special attachments for your leaf blower or wet-dry vac.

 

Stopping the drips

Leaky faucets can be fixed with a little elbow grease and know-how. First, turn off the water to the sink and stop the drain with a rag so you don't lose any small parts while you're dismantling the faucet. A compression faucet needs a new rubber washer to seal the valve, and a drippy washerless faucet can be stopped up with a new O-ring.

 

Warming up to furnace filters

The simplest way to maximize furnace efficiency is quick, easy, and all-to-often forgotten: Make sure to change your furnace filter every two months. Choose the right filter for your model, turn off your furnace, and remove the service panel to swap out the old filter for the new one. Each furnace is different, so consult your manual first.

 

Caring for hardwood floors

Hardwood floors are often a home's most inviting feature. You can keep them that way with proper care. Use cleaning products designed for hardwood -- other cleansers can cause damage. A little water on a cloth works wonders on spills, but too much water will damage the wood. For fabulous floors, vacuum frequently using a hardwood floor attachment to grab dust from between boards without scratching.

 

Replacing a shower head

Replacing a shower head is a small project with a big impact. Remove the existing shower head, then lay thread seal tape at the base of the shower arm before screwing in the new piece. Don't fasten it too tightly. Replace the shower arm if you like -- they're often sold separately.

 

Installing a new thermostat

A programmable thermostat is a big step toward energy efficiency, and it's easy to install. Turn off the breaker to your furnace and air conditioner, then remove the old thermostat, leaving the wires in place. The number of wires (two or four) will help determine which type of thermostat you should buy. Either way, you're on the road to easier heating and cooling.

 

Putting in a ceiling fan

Ceiling Fans need a different light box than other fixtures to support their extra weight. After removing old fixtures, install the new electric box and follow manufacturer's instructions to connect the wires and install the fan. Always remember to cut the power before performing electrical work.

 

Building a low-cost trellis

A rustic trellis can be fashioned from green saplings, dry wood or bamboo poles fastened together with garden twine. You can make a trellis in whatever dimensions are necessary to accommodate your garden's climbing plants, but for a larger trellis, you'll need to figure out how to stake it securely into the earth.

Home Prices Nearing Pre-Crash Levels

by Lakeshore Realty

Home Prices Nearing Pre-Crash Levels

Home price are again approaching the high point they reached in 2006, before the bottom fell out of the housing market.  Black Knight in its Home Price Index Report for April says that U.S. home prices are now only 12 percent off of that peak. 

Black Knights Home Price Index (HPI) was up 0.9 percent in April to $236,000 from $234,000.  This is 6.4 percent higher than the HPI in April 2013 of $222,000.  Prices peaked nationally in June 2006 at $269,000.

Nineteen of the 20 largest states posted month-over-month increases with Arizona which was unchanged for the month, being the lone exception.  The largest gains were in Georgia and Massachusetts each of which posted 1.6 percent appreciation.  Maryland was up 1.4 percent and Delaware and Michigan each increased by 1.3 percent.  After Arizona the smallest price increases were in Iowa (0.4 percent) followed by five states that each posted increases of 0.5 percent, Vermont, Nevada, Nebraska, New York, and Hawaii.

Texas and Colorado set new price peaks as they have done each month since mid-2013.  Dallas, Denver, Houston, San Antonio, Austin and San Antonia also each set another new post-crash high and were joined in April by Nashville.  That city set a new HPI of $200,000, up 1.4 percent from March.

Black Knight's report summarizes sales concluded each month using a repeat sales analysis of home prices on their transactions dates.  The HPI represents the price of non-distressed sales by taking into account price discounts for bank-owned real estate (REO) and short sales.

May 2014 Incline Village Real Estate Office Rankings

by Lakeshore Realty

Lakeshore Realty is still the leader in Real Estate sales in the Incline Village and Crystal Bay real estate market. So far this year our office was involved in the sale of 64 properties around the North Shore of Lake Tahoe. Looking forward, our office is dedicated to ensure that all our clients real estate needs are fulfilled.

This chart reflects real estate sales that took place between Jan 1, 2014 through May 31, 2014.

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